AGEING, DISABILITY SERVICES—THE QUALITY AND SAFETY FRAMEWORK AND THE QUALITY ASSURANCE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM QoN

Ms Barham to the Minister for Finance and Services, and Minister for the Illawarra representing the Minister for Ageing, and Minister for Disability Services—

    1. What are the functions and processes of the Quality and Safety Framework (QSF) and the Quality Assurance Improvement Program (QAIP) within the Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care?
    2. What type of data do the programs collect?
    3. How is the data managed?
    1. Do these programs generate reports on the data collected?
    2. If so,
      1. How often are these reports generated?
      2. Which officers in the Department are provided with reports generated from data collected as part of these programs?
    1. Do the programs make recommendations to improve services based upon data collection and analysis?
    2. If so, will the Minister provide the details of any recommendations made by the QSF and the QAIP?

 

Answer—

  1.  
    1. The Quality Assurance and Improvement Program (QAIP) is a collection of processes that monitors quality and identifies areas for improvement in Ageing, Disability and Home Care (ADHC) operated accommodation support and centre-based respite services. 
      The Quality and Safety Framework (QSF) is a component of the QAIP. It is a monitoring tool used to measure compliance with key policy and procedures. The QSF is completed quarterly.
    2. The QSF comprises 24 Key Performance Indicators, to monitor the development and review of client care plans, levels of incident reporting, completion of health and safety inspections and levels of staff and service usage. Other data that informs quality improvement areas include feedback from clients and families, Ombudsman reports and investigations, Community Visitor reports and internal audits.
    3. For the QSF, at the unit level (group home, centre based respite and large residential units) data is collected on a quarterly basis and reported both regionally and centrally. Other data collected as part of the QAIP is stored in a number of corporate record management and information systems.
  2.  
    1. The unit level data is collated into a regional report. Regional results are aggregated into a state-wide report that is reported to the agency’s Audit and Risk Committee. In addition, a regular report is submitted to the ADHC Executive regarding the operation of ADHC operated accommodation support and centre based respite services.
    2.  
      1. The regional and state wide reports are generated on a quarterly basis. Reports to the Audit and Risk Committee occur quarterly or as required and the reports to the Operational Performance Committee (OPC) occur on an annual basis or as required.
      2. Regional Directors receive reports relating to quality in the services in their region. Regional Improvement Teams have carriage of action plans for quality improvement. The ADHC Executive (Chief Executive and Deputy Directors-General) receive regular reports through the Audit and Risk Committee and the OPC.
  3.  
    1. Results from the QAIP, including QSF, are used to inform service delivery improvement and reform, including training and management of client support plans, and improvements to policies and procedures.
    2. The tools are not used to make recommendations rather each region uses results to inform local action plans. Current state-wide areas for improvement in ADHC operated accommodation services include implementation of the Lifestyle Planning Policy and Guidelines and the commencement of a review of all health-related policies and procedures.

BOARDING HOUSE REFORM PROGRAM OFFICERS

Ms Barham to the Minister for Finance and Services, and Minister for the Illawarra representing the Minister for Ageing, and Minister for Disability Services—

  1. Are the Department of Family and Community Services’ Ageing, Disability and Home Care (ADHC) Boarding House Reform Program Case Managers and Licensing Officers separated?
  2. Are there clear protocols established for referrals to be made between Boarding House Reform Program Case Managers and Licensing Officers?
    1. Has ADHC implemented all recommendations of the NSW Ombudsman outlined in ‘DADHC Monitoring Standards in Boarding Houses. A special report to Parliament under s31 of the Ombudsman Act’?
    2. If not:
      1. Which recommendations has ADHC not implemented?
      2. What is the reason for ADHC not implementing the NSW Ombudsman’s recommendations?

 

Answer—

  1. AHDC Regions allocate resources according to local priorities and circumstances. Where the roles have been combined and performed by the same officers, this has been to allow for a flexible approach to situations such as boarding house closures. It also takes into account that licensing issues can have an effect on the well-being of the resident, and at times there can be an overlap between the two functions.
  2. Where different officers perform the licensing and casework functions they are still part of the same team and report to the same manager, and frequently work together. Whether the roles are separated or combined, in each region serious issues of non-compliance with the Regulation or Licence Conditions are escalated to management for resolution.
  3.  
    1. The Ombudsman’s Report made a number of findings as opposed to specific recommendations. All of these findings have been addressed, specifically:
      • The 2005 Regulation under the Youth and Community Services Act 1973 (YACS Act) was amended in May 2010, and remade in September as the 2010 Regulation, with new provisions including requirements for one staff member on duty to have a first aid certificate, and for safe medication administration and record keeping. The Regulation has clarified the obligations of proprietors. Further reform of the boarding house sector, including boarding houses not currently licensed under the YACS Act, is currently under consideration.
      • Licensed boarding houses are monitored on a six to eight weekly basis and Full Service Reviews of each premises occur once every three years. Ageing, Disability and Home Care’s (ADHC) Central Office monitors data from regions regarding this.
      • Caseworkers specifically for licensed boarding houses are employed to plan and co-ordinate services for residents.
      • Training for regional staff involved in licensed boarding houses occurred in November 2009 and June 2011. Formal training did not occur in 2010 as the focus was on revising the Regulation as well as updating and revising the relevant policies and procedures to support that. In addition to formal training, quarterly meetings occur between the relevant ADHC Central Office policy team and regional staff involved in licensed boarding houses.
      • The Licensing and Monitoring Policy was revised and updated in April 2011 and is available on the ADHC website with a range of supplementary documentation.
    2. See answer to 3 (a) – all findings have been addressed.

YOUNGER PEOPLE IN RESIDENTIAL AGED CARE PROGRAM

Ms Barham to the Minister for Finance and Services, and Minister for the Illawarra representing the Minister for Ageing, and Minister for Disability Services—

  1. How many people under fifty years of age are permanently living in a residential aged care facility in New South Wales?
  2. How many people under fifty years of age living in a residential aged care facility have been transferred to more appropriate accommodation under the Younger People in Residential Aged Care Program?
  3. How many young people with a disability have been diverted from entering a residential aged care facility under the Younger People in Residential Aged Care Program?

 

Answer—

  1. According to Australian Government data as at April 2011, there were 283 people aged under 50 years permanently living in a residential aged care facility in New South Wales.
  2. A total of 119 people aged under fifty years living in residential aged care facilities will be transferred to more appropriate accommodation under the NSW Younger People in Residential Aged Care Program. As at 8 June 2011:
    • 46 people aged under fifty have been supported to transfer from a residential aged care facility back into their homes or into supported accommodation under the Program;
    • an additional 40 people are in the process of transitioning out of a residential aged care facility and into the community; and
    • transition arrangements for an additional 33 people are currently being finalised.
  3. As at 8 June 2011, 113 younger people with a disability have been diverted from entering a residential aged care facility under the NSW Younger People in Residential Aged Care Program.